corona drops still present in lift after a coughing fit

In poorly ventilated areas such as an elevator, drops released when talking or coughing can linger for up to 15 minutes. That says physicist Daniel Bonn of the University of Amsterdam who did research on this.

When people talk or cough, droplets are released. Those drops can potentially spread the coronavirus. “The danger of those tiny droplets is that they can get deep into your lungs,” said Bonn.

Also read: Corona symptoms: how do you know if you have the virus?

In the TV show One today Bonn argues that good ventilation is essential in preventing the spread of the coronavirus. “It turns out that an elevator is a very poorly ventilated space. If a corona patient coughs there, it can linger there for 15 minutes. This also applies to lifts in hospitals. ”

‘Don’t get in an elevator’

“If someone has had a coughing fit in an elevator, fifteen minutes later, small droplets are still present. If the elevator doors would remain open, it would always take about two minutes before those very fine risk drops disappear from the sky. ”

Bonn is affiliated with the University of Amsterdam and advises not to take an elevator, but to take the stairs if possible. “I certainly wouldn’t go into a hospital lift in which corona patients are transported.”

Also read: Everyone can now get tested for the coronavirus, so make an appointment

Policy RIVM

According to him, the health institute RIVM endorses that the risk droplets lead to contamination, but has not adjusted the policy accordingly. “I find that strange, precisely because RIVM uses ‘Better save than sorry’ as a starting point. Singing choirs, carnival, church services and après-ski have been a lot of infections. ”

The scientist recommends opening windows and doors opposite each other for much-needed ventilation. “If the windows at your workplace can open, at least.”

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corona drops still present in lift after a coughing fit

In poorly ventilated areas such as an elevator, drops released when talking or coughing can linger for up to 15 minutes. That says physicist Daniel Bonn of the University of Amsterdam who did research on this.

When people talk or cough, droplets are released. Those drops can potentially spread the coronavirus. “The danger of those tiny droplets is that they can get deep into your lungs,” said Bonn.

Also read: Corona symptoms: how do you know if you have the virus?

In the TV show One today Bonn argues that good ventilation is essential in preventing the spread of the coronavirus. “It turns out that an elevator is a very poorly ventilated space. If a corona patient coughs there, it can linger there for 15 minutes. This also applies to lifts in hospitals. ”

‘Don’t get in an elevator’

“If someone has had a coughing fit in an elevator, fifteen minutes later, small droplets are still present. If the elevator doors would remain open, it would always take about two minutes before those very fine risk drops disappear from the sky. ”

Bonn is affiliated with the University of Amsterdam and advises not to take an elevator, but to take the stairs if possible. “I certainly wouldn’t go into a hospital lift in which corona patients are transported.”

Also read: Everyone can now get tested for the coronavirus, so make an appointment

Policy RIVM

According to him, the health institute RIVM endorses that the risk droplets lead to contamination, but has not adjusted the policy accordingly. “I find that strange, precisely because RIVM uses ‘Better save than sorry’ as a starting point. Singing choirs, carnival, church services and après-ski have been a lot of infections. ”

The scientist recommends opening windows and doors opposite each other for much-needed ventilation. “If the windows at your workplace can open, at least.”

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.