6.9 C
Alba Iulia
Thursday, July 9, 2020

Uncertainty is the biggest headache for Maltese tour operators looking to look to the future

Must Read

Disney Research’s neural face swapping technique can provide high-resolution photorealistic video – TechCrunch

New document published by Disney Research in partnership with ETH Zurich describes a fully automated neural network-based method for...

Russia denies radiation incident despite striking measurements in Northern Europe

The registered particles, according to the international organization, are the result of a nuclear fission caused by humans. The...

The sale of AAP is finalized, which avoids the closure of an 85-year-old “ vital ” press wire

The future of the Australian Associated Press (AAP) newswire has been secured with the inking of a sale to...

The short-term and long-term lack of foresight over how the coronavirus scenario will unfold turns out to be the biggest headache for tour operators.

As the pandemic spreads around the world, the situation seems even more dire for the tourism industry, which has been among the industries most affected by the virus.

Britannia Tours managing director Noel Farrugia said tour operators have gone from a very good year in 2019 to zero sales in two months. “As soon as the pandemic began to make its way to Europe and neighboring countries, people simply stopped wanting to go abroad,” he said.

Farrugia said all outgoing tours in the next six months have been canceled. When asked when he expects tour operators to return to former customers, Farrugia said it was difficult to predict, as the situation would depend on a number of other factors.

“It is difficult to establish a timetable. All we know is that we still have a long way to go. It all depends on the vaccine and the restrictions, as well as the clients’ confidence in the choice to travel, ”he said.

Noel Farrugia said he expects the numbers to return to normal in 2022.

“Once the vaccine is out, I think people will be more than happy to go back to their old ways and start venturing out of the country,” he said.

The president of the Federated Association of Travel and Tourism Agents (FATTA), Iain Tonna, told MaltaToday that the return of travel agencies to normalcy is based on the client’s will to choose to travel again.

“The industry was among the first to be carried out, and will be among the last to return to its former state,” he said.

Tonna said that even if a medical vaccine was found late in the summer, the problems would not end there. “If a vaccine is found around September as some reports suggest, it will be even more difficult to retrieve in winter,” he said.

Despite the uncertainty caused by the virus, travel agencies are taking advantage of the situation and are using downtime to disrupt the operation of their business.

Farrugia said Britannia Tours is conducting surveys to identify the needs of its customers. Better investment in online systems was also introduced by the company during the pandemic. “Over the next few months, we have to think differently. It is also a great way to reinvent the way we operate, ”he said.

Farrugia predicted a change in consumption patterns, echoing Iain Tonna’s view that, in the short term, there could be a change in customer demographics. “People who prefer to travel with operators will continue to prefer operators. Now, given the circumstances, people who preferred to travel alone could opt for the simplest and most reliable choice to go abroad with tour operators, “he said.

Nationalist MP and hotelier Robert Arrigo said that if the government succeeds, a return to normality for tour operators will not be possible until 2022. “If we don’t manage to have a long-term vision of how we will respond to medical and economic issues, we risk losing everything we have accomplished so far, ”said Arrigo.

He called on the government to step up support for tour operators, saying they have been among the hardest hit by the pandemic. “The fear of the unknown will make you step back, even close, and the government must assure operators that it is there to help them,” he said.

“The more you care about health, the more you have to help industries financially,” he said.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Latest News

Disney Research’s neural face swapping technique can provide high-resolution photorealistic video – TechCrunch

New document published by Disney Research in partnership with ETH Zurich describes a fully automated neural network-based method for...

Russia denies radiation incident despite striking measurements in Northern Europe

The registered particles, according to the international organization, are the result of a nuclear fission caused by humans. The Swedish and Finnish nuclear authorities...

The sale of AAP is finalized, which avoids the closure of an 85-year-old “ vital ” press wire

The future of the Australian Associated Press (AAP) newswire has been secured with the inking of a sale to new owners who say they...

25 confirmed cases of COVID-19 now linked to a nail salon in Kingston, Ontario.

Kingston, Ontario area health unit confirms three more COVID-19 cases related to a nail salon in the city of eastern Ontario, warning that all...

More Articles Like This